my london diary index
 

September 2008

Free Garry McKinnon
Al Quds Day March
Hackney Wick Festival
No More Fur March
Great Gorilla Run
Shi'ites Mourn Imam Ali
North Greenwich to Greenwich
Open House at Container City
Apprentice Boys of Derry March
Stockwell Festival - Pineapple Parade
The Peoples March
Hands Off Latin America
TIV and Eisenhower
Nigerians Boycott BA
Barrio Fiesta London
Lewisham Country Fayre
Mayor's Thames Festival
Ace Cafe 15th Reunion
The Peace Concert
De Gaulle and more
RATB - Free the Cuban 5
Shame on Cyprus - Lying Builder
CAAT 'Merchants of Death'
Picnic Warfare - Ministry of Justice
Kurds protest forced removal

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Stock photography by Peter+Marshall at Alamy

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All pictures © Peter Marshall 2008, all rights reserved.
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London Autistic Rights Movement - Free Garry McKinnon

US Embassy, Grosvenor Square, London. Sun 28 Sept 2008

Suporters call for Gary to be tried in the UK and for equal rights with US citizens
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The London Autistic Rights Movement demonstrated outside the US Embassy in London on Sunday 28 Sept pleading for hacker Gary Mckinnon to be tried in the UK or not at all rather than be extradited for trial in America.

McKinnon hacked into computers at the Pentagon and NASA looking for evidence of UFO sitings he was convinced was being hushed up. The ease with which he wandered around these top-secret secure systems has greatly embarrased the US authorities and their reaction is to cry out for his blood rather than asking the kind of awkward questions that demand to be asked about their security.

It was obvious from the start that McKinnon wasn't a spy but a relatively harmless nerd with an obsession, and his recent diagnois as suffering from Asperger's syndrome isn't suprising.

The 2003 extradition treaty pushed through in secret by David Blunkett behind parliament's back is a travesty of justice. A reciprocal arrangement for US citizens wanted for trial here would never have got through in the states.

Let's hope that Jacqui Smith decides to intervene on compassionate grounds and the extradition order is dismissed - and, if thought appropriate, the case tried in the UK. McKinnon is now 42, and a US trial, according to a BBC report, could result in a jail sentence of over 45 years.
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Al Quds Day March

Marble Arch and Piccadilly Circus, London. Sun 28 Sept 2008

The march started off from Marble Arch
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The annual Al Quds Day march is supported by Crescent International, FOSIS, Friends of Al Aqsa, Friends Of Lebanon, Hizb ut-Tahrir, Innovative Minds, Islamic Centre of England, Islamic Human Rights Commission, Muslim Council of Britain, Neturei Karta, Palestine Internationalist, Palestine Return Centre, Respect Party and Stop the War.

It has become a controversial event with groups including the United British Alliance, March for England, International Alliance of Iranian Students, the Worker Communist Party of Iran, Workers Liberty and a group waving Israeli flags demonstrating against it at Piccadilly Circus.

The Iranian groups and Workers Liberty protest because Al Quds Day was started by Ayatollah Khomeini in 1979, (and they allege some of the organisations that support it receive support from the Iranian government. )They feel the event bolsters up the Islamic regime in Iran.

Things got a little heated at Piccadilly Circus, and some demonstrators objected to me taking pictures of them shouting and gesturing at the counter-demonstration, pushing me out of the march. Doubtless some of the other demonstrators on the other side didn't like me photographing them either, and the police certainly wanted me back on the other side of the tape again. It is important to record what's happening, and to stand up for a free press, so I kept taking pictures.
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Hackney Wick Festival

Hackney Wick, London. Saturday 27 September, 2008
Leabank Square
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The Hackney Wick Festival was spread over several sites in Hackney Wick, and unlike the day's Guardian Weekend Magazine who featured 'Hackney Wick' in their 'Lets Move Too...' feature this week, they actually knew where Hackney Wick was, although I find the description of the empty patch of grass opposite St Mary of Eton church on Eastway as Hackney Wick Village Green more than a little ridiculous.

I started at Leabank Square, a Campbell, Zogolovitch, Wilkinson and Gough (CZWG) development from 1988 around a central grass square, already showing its age, next to Gainsborough School. I think there was once a dye works on the riverside site, though the map I saw was a little vague. It has its own short bit of riverbank onto the Lea Navigation, where they were selling books and also tea and scones. I also found some very thorny brambles growing there by walking through them.

From there I took a short walk down to photograph a few buldings in Wallis Rd again, took a look at the Gainsborough School Fete before going to visit St Mary of Eton church. Years ago when I first saw it I thought it a strange name for a church, and it was only later when I became interested in the Manor Gardens allotments that I found out more of the story. It really does being at the King's College of Our Lady of Eton beside Windsor, comonly known as Eton school, where a vision of the BVM led to a decision to become involved "in some charitable work in London" which became a mission in Hackney Wick.

The church that was built, remarkable as it is, was only a part of that mission, which eventually included various sports clubs and some allotments that were unfortunately recently destroyed for the 2012 Olympics. The link with Eton hadn't stayed strong enough to save them, although Eton continue to be patrons of the church.
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No More Fur March

Belgrave Square to Harrods. Saturday 27 Sept, 2008

The march outside Harrods

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It's hard to understand why we still have fur on sale in fashion shops. I suspect its a government mixture of incompetence, their fascination with the fashion industry and other cultural froth and a lack of the guts needed to grab nettles firmly. So although they brought in a law stopping the barbaric practices of fur farming in the UK, fahsion shops - and Harrods - can still sell garments trimmed with fur farmed under event more cruel and stressful conditions in other countries.

The march, organised by the Campaign Against the Fur Trade targeted the Knightsbrige shops of "Gucci, Prada, Escada, Versace, Fendi, Joseph, Armani and Burberry, as well as the notorious Harrods, the only department store in the UK still selling real fur."

It was a larger march than last year's event, with perhaps 4-500 people taking part, and it also seemed to be a rather different group, with fewer of those who looked likely to take part in direct action, and rather more who looked likely to be able to boycott fashion shops (I've never bought anything from Prada or any of the others, and the last time I shopped at Harrods was around 1976.)

There was a very heavy police presence both in Belgrave Square, surrounding the actual march and standing in front of all of the fashion shops that sell fur items. I was several times impeded in my work by being pushed by police as I took photographs and being refused permission to walk onto the pavement, despite shoing a press card. Demonstrators were also prevented from going to hand out leaflets to people on the streets. It doesn't seem to me to be a democratic way to police a protest.

The march stopped outside each of the main shops for a short while and made a lot of noise before moving on, coming to a halt outside Harrods. There was a short speech there and a one minute silence before another avalanche of sound.
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Great Gorilla Run

City of London. Saturday 27 Sept, 2008

Gorillas at the start of the run
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The Great Gorilla run is a charity fun run where the costume is linked to the cause - saving mountain gorillas. The Gorilla Organisation (GO) estimates that there are only around 700 left in the wild, the same number as the 735 runners dressed in gorilla suits for the 7km run which set a new world record.

Most of the runners didn't actually run too far, many walking most of the course, but given the warm sun and the tog rating of a gorilla suit many sweated off a few pounds in any case, as well as collecting large amounts of money for charity - a minimum of £400 per runner - and having a bit of fun. Two things that have perhaps been in short supply around the City lately.
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Shi'ites Mourn Imam Ali

Marble Arch, London. Sunday 21 Sept, 2008

Beating of breasts in mourning at Marble Arch
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Ali ibn Abu Talib was the son of Abu Talib and Fatima bint Asad and was cousin and son-in-law of Muhammed. Ali was one of the first to accept Muhammed's divine revelation and became the fourth caliph in Medina. For Shia Muslims he is the first Imam and he and his descendants are the rightful successors to Muhammad. He is widely revered for his bravery and wisdom as a great Islamic ruler and thinker.

During Ramadan in 661, Ali was leading the morning prayers in the mosque in Kufa, Iraq when an assasin struck his head with a sword, causing a deep cut and he died a few days later.

Shi'ites mourn for Imam Ali every year in Ramadan, remembering his great contribution to their religion and his tragic death. They come together from all over England at Marble Arch to lament and beat their breasts and carry a ritual coffin in a procession in his memory.
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North Greenwich to Greenwich

Thames Path, Greenwich, London. Sat 20 Sept, 2008

Canary Wharf from the Thames Path at North Greenwich
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I took advantage of the free ferry service provided for the Open House weekend and crossed the River Thames from Trinity Buoy Wharf to North Greenwich, then walked back along the Thames path to catch the DLR at Greenwich and make my way home. Its a route I've walked and cycled quite a few times, but always find interesting.
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Open House at Container City

Trinity Buoy Wharf, Leamouth, London. Sat 20 Sept, 2008

Container City, Trinity Buoy Wharf and the Millenium Dome across the River Thames
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When I first photographed Leamouth, Trinity Buoy Wharf was still in use maintaining buoys and I could only take pictures from outside of the site, although later I was able to access it and photograph some of the buildings on the site, and I've returned several times over the years, not least for the fine views across the river of North Greenwich and the Dome as well as to visit exhibitions and some of the artists' studios on the site and 'Longplayer' in London's only lighthouse.

Container City is a set of artists studios built using containers, and has grown considerably since I last saw it. Development in the surrounding area has taken place relatively slowly but looked about to take off although it may well be held up again by current financial problems.
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Apprentice Boys of Derry March

Temple, London. Sat 20 Sept, 2008
Getting ready for the march on the Embankment
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People should be proud of their community and traditions and happy to be photographed when they celebrate these. And most of those whose pictures I took were happy to be photographed "having a fine day out and enjoying themselves."

But at one point I found myself being pushed backwards by a large man in dark glasses and instructed very fimly to leave. This kind of intimidation certainly isn't acceptable and of course I continued to take pictures of the event. But it was a reminder of the darker side of Loyalist Ulster, which I hadn't expected to see on the streets of London.
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Stockwell Festival - Pineapple Parade

Stockwell, London. Sat 20 Sept, 2008

The colourful parade comes up to Stockwell station
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It was good to see so many people enjoying themselves, having fun by taking part in something with other people. Community festivals such as this have an important role in building the kind of relationships that lead to healthy communities.

But among the dancing and fancy dress I also found a reminder of violent death, Stockwell is probably best known for the brutal shooting by police of an innocent unarmed Brazilian man who had just boarded an underground train at Stockwell Station in 2005. The inquest on Jean Charles de Menezes opens at the Oval on Monday. The shrine to him at Stockwell station is in the background of a number of my images - and I also took some closer images.
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The Peoples March

Kennington Park, London. Sat 20 Sept, 2008

Members of bereaved families line up for the start of the march
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Last year, 2007, there were 26 teenagers killed on the streets of London.

So many of those marching in 'The Peoples March' against gun and knife crime were the families and friends of young people whose lives were ended prematurely by violent death, and the grief felt by many of those I photographed was impossible to miss. They were stricken and angry and demanding that something was done to stop the killing.

But it is hard to see what can be done, and how marches like today's event really contribute to this. Effective action would involve huge cultural shifts and a direction of change that would reverse much of what we have seen over the past 50 or so years. The liveliest part of the protest was a Christian group; black-led churches have played an increasingly important part in the community over the last 50 years but don't seem to have had a great effect in stopping the growth of gun and knife crime.

This march from Kennington Park, organised by the Damilola Taylor Trust and other organisations and supported by the Daily Mirror and Choice FM came at the end of London Peace Week. It turned out to be on a slightly smaller scale than the publicity suggested, with perhaps around a thousand marchers leaving Kennington Park, to join other marchers from Camden for a rally in Hyde Park - which, according to the Mirror was attended by 5,000 people. I left the marchers as they walked out of Kennington Park to make my way to a festival in Stockwell which I hoped would cheer me.
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Hands Off Latin America

US Embassy, Grosvenor Square, London. Wed 17 Sept, 2008

Demonstrators call for a stop to US backing for coup attempts in Bolivia, Venezuela, Ecuador and elsewhere
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More than 50 activists turned up for an emergency picket of the US Embassy in Grosvenor Square London on Wednesday 17 Sept called at short notice by the Boliva Solidarity Campaign and Hands of Venezuela, with the support of Equadorians in the UK, Colombia Solidarity Campaign and Global Women's Strike.

As George Bush's term as President comes to a close, US agencies have stepped up their efforts to overthrow left-wing governments across the Caribbean, Central and Latin America. A new Fourth Fleet of the US Navy has been formed to intimidate the area, Venezuelan journalists have discovered a US-backed plot to get rid of Hugo Chavez, and in Bolivia the US has been found backing right-wing violence that has killed more than 30 supporters of President Evo Morales. Both countries have expelled their US ambassadors in response.

NUJ General Secretary Jeremy Dear was one of the speakers at the picket, which was followed by a rally held at the NUJ offices, where the speakers were expected to include the Bolivian ambassador and Venezuelan deputy ambassador, MPs and others - but I was unable to attend.
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TIV and Eisenhower

US Embassy, Grosvenor Square, London. Wed 17 Sept, 2008

Pictures
from around the US Embassy

Apparently the Met has a number of these heavily armoured vehicles, based on a Ford F350 truck chassis with bullet-proof windscreens & blast-proof flooring, using them around Heathrow and to carry the specialist firearms officers of CO19 - they can hold around 6-8 officers. These Jankel armoured Guardian TIV (Tactical Intervention Vehicles) come from a firm based in Weybridge, Surrey though it also has strong connections with Jordan. Company founder Robert Jankel, who died in 2005, was earlier noted for his sports and luxury car designs.

There is something about the black paint and boxy lines of this vehicle that seem rather sinister to me. I didn't like to ask any questions about what the men at the back were doing, but it seemed to be connected with the new defensive landscaping around the US Embassy, which has also given the area around the statue of Eisenhower a facelift, although at the moment some gardening is clearly overdue.

One small tribute "from an English rose" was still there below the statue, rememberering 9/11.
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Nigerians Boycott BA

Harmondsworth, London. Wednesday 17 Sept, 2008

On the verge of the A4 outside BA's HQ near Heathrow
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The Respect Nigerians Coalition called for a boycott of British Airways following an incident in which over 130 Nigerians and other passengers were forced off a plane bound for Lagos in March 2008 when they objected to the brutal mistreatment of a Nigerian being forcibly deported on the flight.

One of them, Ayodeji Omatode, was assaulted by police, arrested and held for 8 hours. He has been charged with threatening behaviour towards a member of the aircraft crew, and his case was due to be heard at Uxbridge Magistrates Court on 18 Sept, but has been postponed.

A small group of protesters came to the Harmondsworth HQ of BA at lunchtime on Wednesday 17 Sept. They were not allowed on to the BA site at Waterside but set up on the main road just outside the offices. Their placards accused British Airways of being insulting, bullying and racist and they called for a full apology to all the Nigerian passengers and compensation for Mr Omatode, as well as a withdrawal of the statements made against him and a change in the company's attitude towards its passengers.
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Barrio Fiesta in London

Lampton Park, Hounslow. Sunday 14 September 2008
Phillipino ice cream seller
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This was apparently the 24th London Barrio Fiesta and is the largest such event in Europe, with some 40-60,000 expected over the two days. Some of the past events, organized by the Philippine Centre in London, have proved controversial in the Filipino community here. I don't know what they made of this year's event, but the comment from 2005 that "event was dominated far too much by private Filipino food vendors,... the usual real estate brokers, housing developers, and Western Union and associated remittance companies, [and] there was little in the way of cultural stall holders" seemed to be a pretty fair description of what was on offer in most of Lampton Park.

But perhaps I just missed the cultural performances in this two-day cultural event?
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Lewisham Country Fayre

Cornmill Gardens, Lewisham. Sunday 14 September 2008
Listening to Bex Marshall band play
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So far as I know, Bex Marshall is no relation, but if you like some good rock with a country flavour and some nice guitar you could do worse than listen to her 'Kitchen Table'. I stayed long enough at Cornmill Gardens to look at all the stalls and listen to most of her set before running off in case Chas ‘n’ Dave were next on the stage.

 

The Mayor's Thames Festival

Southwark, London. Saturday 13-14 Sept, 2008

This young lady is about to cover me in straw
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The Thames Festival was started by Ken a few years back, but as yet Boris hasn't got round to cancelling it - too busy putting up fares on public transport and blaming Ken for the fact that he, Boris, has cancelled the contract for cheap oil out of political pique and decided to waive the extra money he could have collected from charging gas guzzlers more in London.

There were a lot of people around, and quite a few things going on, although most people seemed to be spending most of their times walking up and down along the riverside path. And of course it is a pleasant walk - or at least it is on every other weekend of the year when it isn't so crowded.

I went when the tide was low, and for one section it was simply easier to walk along the foreshore than the path. Where people seemed to be having most fun was on Southwark Bridge where everyone was throwing straw at each other, an activity that didn't seem to get a mention in the programme. I'm not sure if I'll ever get all of the straw out of my camera and bag.

Sunday I was too early to catch much as I walked through Jubilee Gardens, but I did see the 'Barclaycard Freerun Zone' and feel thoroughly depressed by it. Why? Read my piece 'Money Running' on >Re:PHOTO
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Ace Cafe 15th Reunion

Ace Cafe, Stonebridge Park, London. Sat 13 Sept, 2008
'Little Miss Dynamite' in the ring with the camera
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As well as being the 15th Ace Cafe Reunion, this was also the 70th anniversary of the cafe itself. It was an extensive gathering devoted to "the traditions of motorcycles, cars and rock 'n’ roll."

It was never my scene - if anything I was rather more of a mod and a Miles Davis fan, but I can't deny a certain thrill at the roar of Ace Cafe Racer 'Little Miss Dynamite', the latest Stonebridge special on display at the event, ridden in and then swung backwards and forwards at a camera rather like a bull facing the matador.

And who could resist the charms of the London Rocking Rollers?
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The Peace Concert

Trafalgar Square, London. Saturday 13 Sept, 2008

Audience reaction
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'The Peace Concert', in Trafalgar Square was part of the London Week of Peace, endorsed by Gordon Brown, Jacqui Smith, David Cameron and Ian Blair.

It's a misleading name as it not about peace in the wider sense but concerned with community cohesion, promoting justice, equality and respect between people, particularly Londoners, from all backgrounds. It may also be about defusing the kind of grass-roots movements we've seen in some parts of London about civil rights and in particular about knife and gun crime and channeling them into something more easily controlled.
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De Gaulle and more about London

Saturday and Sunday 13-14 Sept, 2008

The Blue Plaque is for Lord "Your country needs you" Kitchener
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Some of the various scenes in London as I travelled around it this weekend, including plaques to Kitchener, Ho Chi Minh and De Gaulle, a very Pineapple pub and a Golden Lion, More London, City Views, an innocent van, the National Gallery, the city across the Thames, some ageing roadside warehouses and anything else that took my fancy!
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RATB protest - Free the Cuban 5

Trafalgar Square, London. Saturday 13 Sept, 2008

Chalking on the pavement - Free the Cuban 5
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Because of 'The Peace Concert' in Trafalgar Square, RATB's Free the Cuban 5 demonstration couldn't be held on the North Terrace in front of the National Gallery and they had to set up in a rather less prominent location on the pavement to the east, a traditional site for demonstrations.

The case of the Cuban 5 has led to the United Nations Commission on Human Rights and Amnesty International criticsing the US government, and to movements in over a hundred countires around the world calling for their release,

The demonstration in Traflagar Square by Rock around the Blockade was one of a number of events around the world to mark the 10th anniversary of their arrest, including in East Timor, Spain, Japan, Australia and the United States.
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Shame on Cyprus - Lying Builder

St James's Square, London. Saturday 13 Sept, 2008

Conor O’Dwyer has been sleeping rough in a tent opposite the Cypriot High Commission since Aug 3rd
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Conor O’Dwyer has been sleeping rough in a tent opposite the Cypriot High Commission in London since 3rd August 2008 in a continous protest against the Cyprus authorities for their lack of action over property frauds. O'Dwyer lost his life savings buying a house in Cyprus that was then unlawfully sold to someone else.

When he went to Cyprus he was badly assaulted by the developer (putting him in hospital for a week) and his camcorder was damaged by the builder's son. Both father and son were arrested, but the case is still awaiting trial. O'Dwyer's attempts to get the Cypriot authorities to take action over the fraud case have so far met with no success.

O'Dwyer's case is apparently one of many similar frauds that have occured, although more serious than most. You can read the details of his case on his Lying Builder web site http://www.lyingbuilder.com/ as well as about his current protest on http://shameoncyprus.com/ Shame on Cyprus.
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CAAT 'Merchants of Death' walking tour

Westminster, Saturday 13 Sept, 2008
Learning about Lockheed Martin outside their London office
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Members of the London branch of the Campaign Against the Arms Trade (CAAT) led a tour around the Westminster offices of some of the world's leading suppliers of arms and of mercenaries. They included Lockheed Martin who will apparently be the main profiteers from the completely illogical and unecessary replacement of our Trident missiles, QinetiQ whose bargain basement sell-off by the MoD benefitted guys like George Bush Sr and others in the Carlyle Group and companies with more soldiers in Iraq than the British Army - much of our wars are now privatised.

One thing these companies seem to have in common is a desire to hide. I don't think a single one of them had its name on the outside in letters more than half an inch high next to a doorbell, and several didn't have that. Unless you've been searching on the web you wouldn't know whether the companies in these offices was selling fruit gums or cluster bombs.

The walk wandered briefly into the SOCPA zone to visit Aegis Defence Services, opposite New Scotland Yard at 39 Victoria St. We'd been there almost 10 minutes before two police officers rode up on bicycles. They seemed very relieved to be told we were a walk and not a demonstration and jumped back on their bikes and rode away almost before they arrived!

Most of the time nobody bothered us. At some sites security men came to take a look but nothing more. The police at Buckingham palace were worried by the placard and insisted it wasn't held up high while we were in the area.

It was an interesting walk, and certainly made me much more aware of how much the international arms trade is an integral part of the British establishment. It also brought home some of the widespread abuses that these companies are involved in.

There is much more about these companies and the immoral trade in arms on both the CAAT and War on Want websites.
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'Picnic Warfare' at the Ministry of Justice

Westminster, London. Thursday 11 Sept, 2008
Getting ready for the picnic in Petty France
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A small group of demonstrators handed out leaflets and held a picnic outside the Ministry of Justice in Westminster on Thursday 11 September 2008.

The protest, organised by Mark Barrett of 'People in Common' called on the government and those working for the Ministry of Justice in particular to end the abuse of power which is increasingly curtailing our freedom.

In particular the leaflet demanded the scrapping of plans for ID cards and a database state and an end to abuses of power such as the use of anti-terror law against peaceful protesters. It called for a repeal of the sections of SOCPA that prevent peaceful demonstration and an end to the powers that enable local councils and other bodies to snoop on individual and for an end to the Counter Terror bill which will greatly increase the powers to collect information on peoples' lives.

The protesters called for a new approach to civil liberties and human rights that will allow democracy to flourish, encouraging rather than treating those engaged in peaceful protest as dangerous terrorists.

The first response of the security guards at the Ministry was to tell the press photographers present that they were not allowed to take photographs, which we didn't reagard at all seriously. After some short discussions, the protest continued on the wide pavement outside the Ministry with both security and police taking a sensibly relaxed attitude for the hour I was there.

People in Common started at the Parliament Square protest in August 2005 against the restrictions on our freedom imposed by the SOCPA act where demonstrators went on to hold another illegal demonstration on Waterloo Bridge, a 'Wesminster Tea Party' in which tea bags were thrown into the River Thames in a protest calling for a 'Tobin Tax' on currency speculators.
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No forced removal - Kurds in Home Office Vigil

Home Office, Marsham St, London. Thursday 11 Sept, 2008

One of the more animated speakers at the vigil

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Around thirty demonstrators held a lunchtime vigil outside the London Home Office organised by the Coalition Against Deportations to Iraq on Thursday 11 Sept, 2008 to oppose the unfair detention and forced removal of Kurdish Iraqi asylum seekers from the UK, which has resulted in an unknown number of deaths.

Many asylum seekers face impossible demands for evidence from our immigration authorities - and are then labelled as 'failed.' Some Kurds have accepted voluntary return to Iraq, often forced on them because they are prevented from working in this country and have to rely on charity of friends and a few small groups supporting them.

In their obscene haste to get higher figures for the number of asylum seekers sent out of this country (often not actually sent 'home'), our government is returning people to situations where they may face death or mistreatment - and even shipping out those who are terminally ill. The lawyer for Mohammad Hussain, who died from cancer on 3 August, successfully challenged an order to send him back in May.

Hussein Ali came here seeking asylum in 2002. Last month he was forcibly returned to Kurdistan and three days later he committed suicide there. He was just one of around 500 Iraqi asylum seeks forcibly sent home to a country where many of them face persecution, imprisonment and possibly torture or death. Our government consider it 'safe', and have even begun to send people to Baghdad.

Among those present at the protest were members of the families of Mohammad Hussan and Hussein Ali. There were speeches in English and also in Kurdish by Kurds who have sought asylum here, speakers from various groups supporting asylum seekers and a PCS trade union rep whose members work in the Home Office.

Two police watched the demonstration, although they showed more interest in the two photographers present, asking for our details and carefully noting them down. It was perhaps ironic that the demonstration was taking place on the site of an art-work with words inscribed on the pavement about the freedoms of the British "Because I am British I am free..." while at the same time here was further evidence of the way that our British freedoms are being eroded and that Big Brother's eye sees and records ever more of our lives.
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All pictures on this section of the site are © Peter Marshall 2008; to buy prints or for permission to reproduce pictures or to comment on this site, or for any other questions, contact me.

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